26 Mar

No Win No Fee Excursion Into History

The British government intend to reform a no win no fee system became obvious when Ken Clarke, UK Justice Minister, made an announcement on March 13, 2011. Initially, it was assumed that the new success fee rules will take effect from October 2012.

Clark suggested that legal fees should not be covered by the losing party, but deducted from the compensation due to the winning party. According to the head of the Ministry of Justice, the plans aimed at making the justice system more balanced and equally fair for all the parties. At the same time the government was in favor of limiting attorneys’ fees to 25% from compensation in contrast to the earlier proposal for 10 percent of the amount. The government’s proposal was supported by parliamentarians, but the authoritative figures expressed concern that the government’s plans can go too far. According to them, the desire to limit the success fee could lead to the lawyers’ dramatically low interest even in the accident claims doomed for success. Indeed, judging by the tendencies at Solicitors Guru, the largest platform that gathers hundreds of licensed lawyers and agencies in the country, the branch is flourishing, pop in and find a solicitor.

A no win, no fee system was introduced in the UK as a result of the reform of the judicial system, held in 1999. It enabled solicitors to operate within the framework of conditional fee arrangement. With the introduction of this system an ‘After the Event’ insurance mechanism was born. These actions contributed to a real revolution: the system has become extremely actively used by both providers and consumers.

Initially, the government believed that the reforms, carried into effect, will make a solid contribution into more accessible legal services. Additionally, such rules should have become a perfect incentive for a lawyer: thus, the center of gravity shifts to an overall success of the case, not on the time spend to achieve positive results. So if you want know more about practical matter of this – read detailed explanations of no win no fee conception on the specialized source.

02 Mar

The Transport System Of Leeds

A64 LeedsThe greater Leeds is crossed by M1 motorway and a range of highway, including A58, A62, A63, A64, A65. M1 is one of the most important transport arteries of England that connects Leeds with London. A58 leads to Prescott, A62 to Manchester, A63 to Kingston, A64 to Scarborough and A65 to Cumbria. Due to a highly developed road system and a broad variety of hotels in Leeds, the popularity of the city grows among auto tourists exponentially.

In the 60s of the last century an extremely ambitious project of circumferential highway has been implemented in the city. A good part of the road falls to the share of underground tunnels. Thus, in contrast to Birmingham, Leicester and many other cities in England, Leeds has managed to minimize the damage caused to an ancient look and feel by the development of the transport system. Therefore, with a sweeping selection of accommodation options, including totally affordable serviced apartments Leeds offers legions of tourists to plunge into an ancient atmosphere of the city.

Some shopping streets in the central part of Leeds (e.g. Brigat) are closed for vehicles. In early 2006 the free bus route has been launched due to the initiative of city authorities: the form of public transport that exists in many European cities is highly appreciated by the tourists. The trams have been abolished in November 1959; today the city is considering the option of introducing trolleybus routes. The ‘Next generation transport’, held in Leeds in 2009, resulted into a new initiative to reincarnate trolleybus tradition in the city. The city estimates the implementation of a new project at 280 million pounds, while the launch of the new type of public transport is scheduled for the year of 2015. However, a similar initiative has been declined by the government in 2004.

01 Mar

European Gambling Regulation Aspects Nuances

The material is prepared by a large gambling reviewing website – Apnet Casino, a platform finding itself on the crest of a wave and investing wisely in research activities.

To date, gambling establishments are allowed in the 128-countries, and Europe is one of the most gambling-saturated regions. Gambling houses present in virtually all the countries of the union with the exceptions of San Marino, Liechtenstein and the Greek part of Cyprus. European laws, which govern the operation of casinos, are relatively liberal. At the same time, the administration of a gambling house is obliged to independently control their customers. The basic attitude of European countries to the gaming business is to ‘resolve and control’. Europeans have realized that prohibiting such activities is senseless, because gambling generates heaps of money that considerably replenish state budget. In addition, the ban will only lead to an increase in the number of shadow casinos, and a complete lack of knowledge of the state in this sector. Read More